Previous
Guatemala
Antigua and Barbuda
11:00 AM UTC
Game Details
Next
United StatesUnited States
Costa RicaCosta Rica
6
0
FT
Game Details
United StatesUnited States
SwedenSweden
3
2
FT
Game Details

Women's WC final viewers top men's final in U.S.

Megan Rapinoe spoke following the USWNT's victory at the 2019 World Cup about the pending legal case against the US Soccer Federation.
Becky Sauerbrunn praised the growth of women's soccer and explained why now would be a good time for FIFA to improve the rewards offered to women's sides.
Golden Boot and Golden Ball winner Megan Rapinoe reflects on the impact the USWNT has had on and off the field after defending their World Cup title.

The United States' 2-0 victory over Netherlands in Sunday's FIFA Women's World Cup final averaged nearly 15.6 million U.S. viewers on English- and Spanish-language television.

It was the most-viewed match this season, but a decrease from the 2015 final.

The match averaged 14.27 million viewers on Fox, according to the network and Nielsen, and peaked at 19.6 million. It was a 22 percent increase over last year's FIFA World Cup men's final between France and Croatia, which averaged 11.44 million.

The audience was down 43.8 percent from the 2015 final between the U.S. and Japan, which averaged 25.4 million viewers. That match, though, was played in Canada and started at 7 p.m. ET, compared to Sunday's final in France, which kicked off at 11 a.m. ET.

The Telemundo broadcast averaged 1.3 million and peaked at 2 million as the match concluded.

The match averaged 589,000 viewers online -- 289,000 on Fox apps and 300,000 on NBC and Telemundo apps -- which makes it the most-streamed Women's World Cup match ever.

The CONCACAF Gold Cup final between the U.S. and Mexico averaged 2.9 million on Fox Sports 1, making it the most-viewed non-World Cup match in the network's five-year history.

The Copa America final between Brazil and Peru averaged 3.1 viewers on Telemundo. The ESPN-plus streaming service had the English-language rights, but the network did not divulge figures.

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.